Lucky coins, horseshoes, amulets and dragons. Just some of the lucky charms that you will find on a travel of the world. From continent to continent, traditions are different. But almost all countries have a good luck charm that has been adopted by the people as their own. Good luck can be brought about by so many charms.

Switzerland Good Luck Charm

Switzerland is an eclectic nation made up of French speakers, Germany speakers, Romansh speakers and Italian speakers. The diverse nature of the Swiss cantons and regions means you have mini countries within a country. As a result, there is no one lucky charm that has been adopted across the country. One of the most popular, however, is the pig which is seen as bringing good luck, particularly at New Year when residents wish each other “a lot of pigs”.

History of the lucky charm pigs

The luck associated with pigs in Switzerland dates back to the Middle Ages when it was thought that keeping a significant number of pigs was a sign of prosperity. That is where the phrase to wish someone a happy new year and a lot of pigs is said to have originated.

Why pig charms are bringing luck

As just mentioned, wishing someone a lot of pigs to bring in the New Year is equal to wish them wealth and happiness. Therefore, in Switzerland the pigs are seen as a lucky charm.

How to use the pig charm

Pig charms are worn on a necklace chain around the neck, or as part of a bracelet.

How the pig charm is made

Pig charms are most often made from silver. Alternative options can be purchased in gold or other metallic elements. The charm is hung from a necklace or bracelet strap.

How to make a pig charm at home

You will need to buy a pig charm from a luck charm specialist, but that doesn’t mean you can’t personalise it. You can add to a favourite necklace, make it part of your charm bracelet or hand make your own good luck charm featuring it.

Interesting and fun facts about the pig charm

· Pigs are an unusual good luck greeting at New Year
· Swiss residents wish people “a lot of pig”
· Pigs were a sign of wealth in the Middle Ages