The Jew with a Coin charm is associated with having good luck in terms of becoming rich or at least not having any money worries. They are usually figurines or little statues but they can also be images. Oil paintings of Jews with Coins are also lucky charms.

History of The Jew with a Coin Good Luck Charm

The history of this charm doesn’t date back very long. While figures of traditionally dressed Jews were found many years ago, the statues with coins being used for good luck are much more recent, with most originals dating from 1989 onwards.

Why the Jew with a Coin Charm Brings Luck

The reason why the charm is supposed to bring good luck is also the reason that many people see the charm as offensive. The stereotype of Jews and money is the basis for this little figure being good luck and bringing prosperity to the owner.

How to Use the Jew with a Coin Charm

The Jew with a Coin is a figure that is placed in the home or building where good luck is needed or wanted. Many traditions surround these charms and each person chooses to use their charm in the way they wish. Some people keep it by the door so that fortune cannot escape, others always carry them with them to make sure they are covered.

How the Jew with a Coin Charm Is Made

The Jew with a Coin figure is usually made of out of clay or carved out of wood. They are then painted to resemble a figure that most people would associate with being a Jew, often in traditional Jewish dress and a bag of coins is placed in the hand.

How to Make the Jew with a Coin Charm at Home

These charms are usually purchased in shops or ordered online. However, if you would like to try making your own lucky charm to bring good fortune and money then all you need is some clay that you can mold into the shape of a person. Heat the clay to set it and paint the features of a Jew, without forgetting to add the coin or sack of money.

Interesting and Fun Facts About the Jew with a Coin Charm

  • This charm is sometimes referred to as the ‘Little Jew’ or the ‘Lucky Jew’ charm.
  • Some of these charms are sold with instructions to turn the figure upside down or place a coin behind it so that good fortune comes to the whole household.
  • Having a Jew with a Coin charm may cause offense to some Jews who see the figure as Anti-Semitic, while other Jews own them themselves and see them as an innocent good luck charm.